Baking and Cake Art Academy https://bakingandcakeart.com Professional, High Quality Baking and Cake Art Instruction Fri, 22 Sep 2017 20:32:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 National Eat a Cranberry Day https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/11/22/national-eat-a-cranberry-day/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/11/22/national-eat-a-cranberry-day/#respond Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:09:37 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=2207 My mom loved to cook and bake! Thanksgiving was an important family time—my dad actually took the day off—mostly—from his business and that meant everyone enjoyed the day. One thing my mom did not make was cranberry sauce. We had homemade everything else but the CS was Ocean Spray’s famous jellied variety. When I was […]

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My mom loved to cook and bake!

Thanksgiving was an important family time—my dad actually took the day off—mostly—from his business and that meant everyone enjoyed the day. One thing my mom did not make was cranberry sauce. We had homemade everything else but the CS was Ocean Spray’s famous jellied variety.

When I was put in charge of dinners-due to my parents’ work schedule I discovered a recipe for mini meatloaves that were smothered with whole OS cranberry sauce which became a favorite with my younger brother. So most of my life was spent appreciating OS cranberry products. Some years ago, one of my Catering I students, Martha, shared a family recipe for Cranberry Sauce –I have made this every year since. I converted the volume measurements to weights and made a few modifications- and I now share this delicious recipe with you!

CHEF SUSAN’S CRANBERRY CITRUS SAUCE

EQUIPMENT NEEDED: Chef’s knife, paring knife, peeler, zester, melon scoop, sauce pan, spoon, stainless steel bowls, liquid measuring cup, digital scale.
INGREDIENTS:
Fresh cranberries, picked over 2 pounds
Granulated sugar 1 pound 12 ounces
Fresh orange juice 1 pound
Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored, cubed the same size as the cranberries 12 ounces
White wine, not too sweet or cheap 8 ounces
Orange zest, minced 1.5 ounces
Lemon Zest, minced I Tablespoon plus 1 ½ teaspoon
Lemon Juice 1 ounce
Nutmeg, ground 1 teaspoon
Ginger, ground 1 teaspoon
Cinnamon, ground, Korintje 1 teaspoon

PROCEDURE:
1.Zest lemon and orange, and mince.
2.Heat sugar and orange juice in the saucepan about 5 minutes until sugar dissolves.
3.Add cranberries and apples. Cook for 20 minutes until cranberries pop. Stir occasionally.
4.Add the remaining ingredients. Simmer ro 25-30 minutes until thickened.
5.Cool, stir occasionally to let steam escape for about one hour. Let cool to room temperature and refrigerate covered.
6.Will last many weeks if kept covered and refrigerated.

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Bill Hauser’s Mom’s Peanut Cookies https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/11/09/bill-hausers-moms-peanut-cookies/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/11/09/bill-hausers-moms-peanut-cookies/#respond Wed, 09 Nov 2016 05:57:47 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=2204 In honor of National Peanut Butter Month  I got to thinking about one of my high school students years ago who shared a recipe for his mom’s Peanut Butter Cookies. Because of their distinct shape and flavor combination, the recipe has turned out to be one several go-to favorites for massive catered school events whenever cookies fit […]

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In honor of National Peanut Butter Month 

I got to thinking about one of my high school students years ago
who shared a recipe for his mom’s Peanut Butter Cookies.
Because of their distinct shape and flavor combination,
the recipe has turned out to be one several go-to favorites for massive
catered school events whenever cookies fit the occasion.

FYI,

when making any amount of cookie dough, the baker
needs to be attentive to thorough mixing of the ingredients-
especially when using a mixer.
This usually involves folding the finished dough from top to bottom a few times-
this helps planetary –type mixers achieve a homogenous result.
There are seven types of cookie mixtures;
Bill Hauser’s Mom’s Peanut Butter Cookies
fall into the
Molded variety.
I mixed this dough, which makes about 48 one-half ounce
Cookies, with a rubber scraper.
Therefore, this small batch recipe is great to make with your kids.
No worries about your kids using a mixer!

Ingredients:

48 Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Kisses
3.25 ounces Crisco Shortening
7 ounces Creamy Peanut Butter (I used Peter Pan Brand this time but have used
others)
2 ounces granulated sugar
2.25 ounces light brown sugar
1 large egg (1.75 ounces)
1 ounces milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
7 ounces All Purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
Approximately 4 ounces of granulated sugar for coating
Method:

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees

2. Remove the wrappers from chocolate kisses
3. Sift flour, baking soda and salt together.

4.With a rubber scraper, beat shortening and peanut butter in a large
bowl until well blended.

5. Add sugars and continue to blend thoroughly.
6 .Beat in milk, egg, and vanilla extract until well blended.

7. Add sifted flour mixture and mix into the peanut butter mixture using
large strokes with the rubber scraper until homogenous dough is
formed.

8. Using a scale, measure out ½ ounces portions of dough.

9. Roll each portion into a ball and roll around in sugar to coat the round
ball of dough.

10. Place on Parchment Paper about 16 per sheet pan.

11. Bake 8 minutes and turn pan around and bake another 2 minutes. The
cookies will appear cracked-this is supposed to happen.

12. Press a chocolate kiss onto each hot cookie.

13. Remove cookies to a wire rack to cool.

14. Let cookies cool so that the chocolate candy will maintain the shape.

15. I store in an airtight container and the cookies are quite freezable
wrapped tightly.

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Seedless Grape Pie with Concord Grape Wine https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/09/12/seedless-grape-pie-with-concord-grape-wine/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/09/12/seedless-grape-pie-with-concord-grape-wine/#respond Mon, 12 Sep 2016 21:18:14 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=2038 Or How to Reduce a Recipe When You Have Less of a Major Ingredient but Want to Make the Recipe Anyway! WARNING: There are over twenty steps to this but at least read on so that if you are ever in a similar situation, you too can MAKE WHATEVER YOU WANT ANYWAY! This experiment began […]

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Or
How to Reduce a Recipe When
You Have Less of a Major
Ingredient but
Want to
Make the Recipe
Anyway!

WARNING: There are over twenty steps to this but at least read on so
that if you are ever in a similar situation, you too can
MAKE WHATEVER YOU WANT ANYWAY!

This experiment began because
I have left-over organic red seedless grapes from

A sourdough starter experiment!
Some of the grapes were a little too ripe for eating-maybe-

But I just did not want to
throw them away!

Yes- I could eat them-but nothing creative in that!

Remembered a picture of a grape pie that I saw
in my files-SOMEWHERE!

Researched some more and found a recipe from the
Better Homes and Gardens site and decided
To adapt it!

So I write ADAPT because I knew that I did not have
Enough grapes from the volume called for-7 cups!

And I had another sweet wine rather than what is called for.

And I did not want to use flour as the thickener.

 SO- in order to remake the recipe so I could use the amount of grapes
That I actually have in my refrigerator,
I have to determine:

Step 1: How much of the grapes did the original recipe call for
And compare that-and do not freak out-mathematically-
to the amount that I have.

Step 2: Weigh one cup of the grapes which equals 5.5 ounces.

Step 3: Multiply 7 (cups) by 5.5 ounces because the recipe calls for 7 cups of
Grapes and that equals 38.5 ounces.

Step 4: Weigh the grapes that I have which equals 28 ounces.

Step 5: Divide what I have (28 ounces) by 38 ounces (what the original recipe called for) and that equals .736 or
In this case because the number is less than 1.0-this number is called a
Reduction Factor.

Step 6: Multiply each of the ingredients for the master recipe by .736 (reduction factor)
And you will get the weights and measurements for the new recipe.

With the help of my assistant, Paul, a chart that will help demonstrate the
Progression of the formula change has been included here

Ingredient

Weighed

Original

.736 Factor Reduction

7 cups Seedless Red grapes

5.5 oz per cup

38.5 oz

28 oz

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

3.5 oz

3.5 oz

2.5 oz

1/3 cup Corn Starch

@4.5 oz per cup

1.5 oz

1 oz

2 Tbsp. fresh sage

2 Tbsp

2 Tbsp

1.47 = 1.5 Tbsp

¼ cup Concord Grape Wine

2.25 oz

2.25 oz

1.75 oz

Egg White

1

1

1

Water

1 Tbsp

1 Tbsp

1 Tbsp

Crust Pie Pastry

Step 7: Procedures that I sometimes modified from the original formula-
because of faster preparation with no consequences to result.
I cut the grapes in half using a scissors rather than a knife.
Worked fantastically!

Step 8: Measured all of ingredients.

1 Tablespoon plus 1 ½ teaspoon fresh cut sage.

Packed brown sugar.


Step 9: Preheated my calibrated oven to the equivalent of 350 degrees F.
(How and why to figure this is in another blog.)

Step 10: Mixed cornstarch, sage, and brown sugar together (using my hands to
crush and mix the sugar.)

The organic fresh sage is from my garden.

Mixture after using my hands to crush the brown sugar

And mix with the other ingredients.

Step 11: Mixed wine and grapes together and then added the dry mix to it and let sit 20 minutes.


The dry ingredients and the grape and wine mixtures combined.

Step 12: Rolled the dough for the bottom crust and put it into the pie pan.

I used my 1/8-inch Space Bars to determine dough thickness.

Step 13: After 20 minutes, strained the liquid from the grapes into a small saucepan.

Step 14: Cooked liquid until it thickened.

Step 15: Scraped the thickened liquid mixture into the bowl with the grapes and mixed all.

Step 16: Placed mixture into the pie crust lined pie pan.

Step 17: Rolled top crust-cut it one inch bigger than the pan (in this case 10 inches in diameter.)

Step 18: Folded top pastry under bottom pastry; flute crusts together.

Fluted crusts.

Step 19: Brush top crust all over with egg white mixed with the Tbsp. of water.

Step 20: Cut steam vents into the top crust.

Step 21: Wrapped 1 ½ inch wide strip of aluminum foil around the fluted edge of the pie crust.

Step 22: Placed pie onto a parchment lined sheet pan.

Step 23: Baked pie 25 minutes.

Step 24: Removed foil from the edge of the pie-CAREFULLY!

Step 25: Bake the pie 35 minutes more until you can see
The filling bubble at the steam vents.

You can see the filling bubbling-or get the idea!

Step 26: Let the pie cool 6 hours so that the filling can thicken.

My husband likes all with my handmade chocolate ice cream! Serves 8 -ish depending on the size of each piece.

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Thursday Thoughts – September 1st https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/08/26/thursday-thoughts-september-1st/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/08/26/thursday-thoughts-september-1st/#respond Fri, 26 Aug 2016 18:48:53 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=2028 Do not have my own kiddos For those of you who do or are kids at heart A recipe for Banana Strawberry Paletas An idea for a weekend activity…. Or a Blender Breakfast…..if you Do not have the patience for the freezing part…… Equipment: Blender, popsicle molds, craft sticks, pitcher for pouring if blender jar […]

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Do not have my own kiddos
For those of you who do or are kids at heart
A recipe for Banana Strawberry Paletas
An idea for a weekend activity….
Or a Blender Breakfast…..if you
Do not have the patience for the freezing part……

Equipment:

Blender, popsicle molds, craft sticks, pitcher for pouring if blender jar is awkward, scale (optional), scissors (to cut open the frozen fruit bags).

Ingredients:

  • 10 ounces ripe (not too ripe) bananas (about 3 medium)
  • 7 ounces thawed frozen unsweetened crushed pineapple
  • 8-9 ounces thawed unsweetened frozen strawberries
  • 7 ounces almond milk or milk or soy milk
  • 7 ounces fruit juice (mango combination or other)

Directions:

  1. Scale the ingredients into blender jar.
  2. Place top onto jar
  3. Blend about 30-40 seconds
  4. Place in pitcher or measuring cup
  5. Fill molds to desired amount
  6. Top mold with lid
  7. Place craft stick into top of mold
  8. Freeze at least 5 hours till firm
  9. Unmold-may have to dip mold briefly in hot water
  10. Enjoy

#frozenfruit #yummy #kidsinthekitchen #popsicle #healthysnack

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Icing vs Frosting-and Bakers’- speak – Is there a difference? https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/08/24/icing-vs-frosting-and-bakers-speak-is-there-a-difference/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2016/08/24/icing-vs-frosting-and-bakers-speak-is-there-a-difference/#respond Wed, 24 Aug 2016 20:14:49 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=2023 “Chef, what is the difference between icing and frosting?” Do you ice or frost a cake? Does it sound more refined to say “ice” than “frost?” Historically, icing refers to a more European origin and frosting is the American term for icing and, even though America is younger- frosting appeared in print here before icing […]

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“Chef, what is the difference between icing and frosting?”

Do you ice or frost a cake?

Does it sound more refined to say “ice” than “frost?”

Historically, icing refers to a more European origin and

frosting is the American term for icing and, even though America is younger-

frosting appeared in print here before icing in 1610 while icing was seen in print in 1760!

In America, according to Larousse Gastronomique, frostings cover soft icings such as buttercreams and cake fillings, chocolate icing but not royal icing—which is ALWAYS referred to as royal icing.

Outside of America, according to Larousse Gasrtonomique……, “the soft cake covering and filling made by whisking sugar syrup into egg whites is usually called American frosting!”

Guys-I call that Italian Meringue !

When you add butter to that cooled mixture-you have Italian Meringue Buttercream-the Rolls Royce of buttercreams!

I just call it buttercream! I usually do not add icing or frosting to the description at all!

I say “Let’s finish the cake with…

Which is  Baker’s speak-for ice or frost in….Italian Meringue Butterceam or whatever—Swiss Meringue Buttercream, or French Buttercream.

So where are we with this “name calling?”

Based on all of the above—use the terms ice and frost interchangeably with the historical facts swirling about in your head

Most of all-have fun icing or frosting your cakes/desserts!

For a look at how to make Chef Susan’s Italian Meringue Buttercream

#cake#sweet#yummy

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Congratulations to Chef Susan! https://bakingandcakeart.com/2015/06/23/congratulations-to-chef-susan/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2015/06/23/congratulations-to-chef-susan/#respond Tue, 23 Jun 2015 17:48:29 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=1975     We’re thrilled to announce that Chef Susan was awarded the 2015 California Council of Adult Education (CCAE) CALCO Excellence in Teaching Award for the Los Angeles Metropolitan section. The CCAE was founded in the 1940’s and is a prestigious and politically active force in supporting adult education in Sacramento and beyond. Chef Susan […]

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We’re thrilled to announce that Chef Susan was awarded the 2015 California Council of Adult Education (CCAE) CALCO Excellence in Teaching Award for the Los Angeles Metropolitan section. The CCAE was founded in the 1940’s and is a prestigious and politically active force in supporting adult education in Sacramento and beyond. Chef Susan received enthusiastic applause from those in attendance, including a group of her current students who showed up to support her.

Chef Susan was nominated for the award by the Principal of the West Valley Occupational Center where she’s taught Commercial Baking, Cake Decoration and Catering for 18 years.

#cakedecorating  #losangeles #bakingclasseslosangels #bakingteacherlosangeles #bakingclasses #cakedecorationclasses

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Chef Susan’s Promised Tres Leches… https://bakingandcakeart.com/2015/01/27/chef-susans-promised-tres-leches/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2015/01/27/chef-susans-promised-tres-leches/#respond Wed, 28 Jan 2015 06:11:05 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=1949 In the first quarter of 2014 I asked our online community of any interest in a super Tres Leches dessert. Response…amazing! As I had many scheduling hurdles in 2014, my focus was drawn away from the goal of developing a modified version of what we had been using at the Occupational Center to serve over […]

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In the first quarter of 2014 I asked our online community of any interest in a super Tres Leches dessert. Response…amazing!

4075de62-964e-4895-8f2e-1e8c7a0da9b9

As I had many scheduling hurdles in 2014, my focus was drawn away from the goal of developing a modified version of what we had been using at the Occupational Center to serve over 1000 people on our International Days before the end of 2014!

Instead, I am celebrating Tres Leches success for 2015!

My challenge was that I had already developed a delicious formula for the Tres Leches syrup—it needed a cake to match its excellence.

I was looking for a type of sponge cake that absorbed more syrup and simpler to make than the one we had been using. My research took me to Heavenly Cakes by Rose Levy Beranbaum which turned out to be from a former chef employer, Mary Sue Milliken. The class turned this recipe into a sheet version using 18 eggs, which normally yields an appropriate amount of batter. The results were not what I was looking for exactly—too dry and lumpy for some reason—could have been a student error-who knows-and no time to try again.

As still not happy with the experiment at school as I wanted to make a smaller round dessert- size as per Beranbaum. The book references a 3-inch high version which I made and not happy with the shape-I continued….

My next experiment yielded a Happy Day!

My thoughts lead me to refer back to my own upscale dessert business before I began my current career as the Director of the Culinary Arts Department at “West Valley Occupational Center in the San Fernando Valley.

Back then I had baked many a genoise in 10 x 2 inch round pans and all of them contained 6 large eggs as does Beranbaum’s /Millikens’s recipe.

Why not, I thought, try a tried and true size pan for this search as well!

In addition to the book’s ingredients, I added ¼ teaspoon baking powder sifted with the all- purpose flour as the book’s sponge seemed so unusually delicate even when baking principles were followed perfectly by yours truly.

It worked! And no sinking and pulling from the side of the pan this time!

I offer some handy hints for success:

1. Once completed, this cake must be refrigerated at least overnight. I would caramelize the sweetened condensed milk 4-5 hours before you want to make the syrup.

2. The unbaked foam batter is fragile despite using room temperature eggs (a must for best volume), and heating the eggs over a hot water bath (baine marie) to 109 degrees F.
(The correct consistency of the eggs and sugar and vanilla once the mixture is whipped for at least 5 minutes after warming to 109 degrees F.)

3. I use my hand to constantly stir the egg sugar mixture while the mixing bowl is over the simmering water bath. I use my hand so as to feel the warmth of the egg and make sure that all of the sugar is dissolved by feeling the mixture as it warms. A baker’ technique.
 (Sugar and egg that must be mixed immediately after adding the sugar to room temperature eggs.)

 (Using hand to mix the eggs and sugar over the bain marie)

 (Bowl on top of saucepan which shows the bain marie)

4. Once the heated eggs are beaten to the ribbon stage, scrape this batter into the 10 x 2 inch round cake pan, use a bowl scraper with a generous sweeping motion—not little swipes-so as to quickly though gingerly allowing the batter to fall in large quantity. I do this as the side of the cake pan rather than the middle so as to not to cause deflation of the foam in the middle of the pan—destruction of the air cells. The batter will flow and fill the entire pan

.(genoise batter in cake pan ready to immediately into the oven)

5. Bake immediately in a preheated and calibrated oven. The oven is set at 350 degrees F and bake for 30 minutes.

6. I use two thermometers in my oven to calibrate. I actually have to set my oven to 320 which allows the oven to actually bake at 350 degrees! You must know this for success—my oven was off this many degrees even when it was brand new!

7. Let the cake cool in the pan 5 minutes as it should still be “attached” to the pan sides and perfectly level.

8. After 5 minutes of cooling down time, loosen the cake from the side with a straight  metal spatula, sprinkle the top with about 2 teaspoons of granulated sugar all over and flip the cake onto a piece of parchment covered cake board. The sugar prevents sticking.

(Sugar on top of cake before turning out of pan)

9. Keep the parchment paper that lined the bottom of the pan  (which is now on top) on the cake!! So you have parchment on the top and bottom.

10. Cool the cake.

11. Wash the cake pan. Line the cake pan with plastic wrap so as to come up the sides and over to the outside of the pan.

12. Lift the cake from the parchment paper that is under the sugar coated cake top and place the cake into the pan flipping the cake so as the top is now the top again.

b31fea76-5209-48ae-91af-b3caf56c80ec(Bake cake flipped out of pan to cool)

13. I do not remove the golden brown crust from the top as it has a delicious curarized flavor!

14. Now you poke holes in the cake top with a thin wooden skewer all over including all around the cake edge about ¼ inch inside the perimeter of the cake. The holes facilitate the delicious syrup to disperse throughout the cake layer better than if not poked.

15. Make the syrup according to the directions following this overview, and apply the syrup that has cooled 5 minutes. I use a ladle and you make sure that all of the syrup is added being careful to make sure that the edges of the cake are included!

16. I ladle enough syrup to cover the cake and let it sink in and then ladle some more. Use all!

17. Let the syrup filled cake cool 45 minutes or until just cool.

18. Cover with parchment paper and then plastic wrap.

19. Refrigerate 8-12 hours.

20. When cool, I uncover the cake and flip the cake onto a cake board of equal diameter (10 inches).

(Refrigerated cake that contains the syrup ready to take out for decorating using a cake board)

 (Cake onto cake board and ready to have parchment paper that was used in the baking removed for icing.)

21. I ice and decorate the cake photographed here with stabilized whipped cream so the cake has a shelf life of several days covered in the refrigerator—if it lasts! And great if you own a restaurant or deli!

4075de62-964e-4895-8f2e-1e8c7a0da9b9(Iced and decorated with stabilized whipped cream flowers)

f4170428-481d-424b-8896-c1dfeb77ad89(Cut slice ready to serve and enjoy!)

 

You can find the formula for stabilized Whipped Cream on my YouTube channel video link.

This cake is loved by all who tasted it so far—even those who do not like Tres Leches dessert!

Enjoy and please let me know of your efforts on our Facebook Page or here on the blog posts!!

Best regards and Happy New Year 2015!

Chef Susan
Bake America Stronger!

P.S. I use the leftover caramelized milk for my recipe of Alfajores which will be included and shared in a future email! CS

(Be sure to read the previous hints before preparing the dessert.)
 

Tres Leches-The Sponge

Yields:  one ten inch round cake.

Number of Servings: 8-10 or more or less depending on slice size
Large eggs (room temperature)      11 ounces
Superfine Sugar (Bakers’)               7 ounces
Vanilla Extract                                  ¾ teaspoon 
Salt                                                   ¼ teaspoon
All-purpose Flour (bleached)            7 ounces
Baking Powder                                 ¼ teaspoon

Crisco to coat the pan
All-purpose flour to coat the pan
 
Equipment: Parchment paper, scissors, 10 inch x 2 inch round aluminum cake pan (I use Magic Line pans), 5 quart stand mixer, whip attachment, mixer bowl, saucepan (2-3 quart), bowl scraper, rubber scraper, measuring spoons, 1 bowl to crack eggs one at a time into the mixer bowl, hand or brush to spread Crisco onto inside cake pan, sifter or sieve, thermometer, timer, scale. 

Procedure:

  1. Completely coat the pan with thin coat of shortening. Flour the pan and tap excess off of the shortening.
  2. Preheat the calibrated oven to 350 degrees F
  3. Line the bottom of the cake pan with parchment that fits exactly.
  4. Put water into the saucepan so as to not allow the mixer bowl to touch the water.
  5. Heat the water to simmering not boiling.
  6. Place the mixer bowl with eggs and sugar over the water bath (baine marie) and with your hand stir the mixture rapidly so to prevent the eggs from cooking-you just want them pretty warm—and the sugar dissolved; 109 degrees F is fine.
  7. Put the bowl immediately onto the mixer and fit with whip and whip on high speed until the eggs are at the ribbon stage, rather a soft-definite peak—5-6 minutes.
  8. I sift the flour and baking powder twice before adding to the eggs at this time.
  9. Once the eggs are cool and whipped as described above, I add using a sieve about ½ of the flour/baking powder to the eggs and use my hand to fold this into the eggs rapidly but gently opening my hand to gain surface area. When I can see that most of the flour has disappeared, I add the rest and do the same thing as gently and as rapidly as I can so as to not deflate the eggs.
  10. Then as in number #4 hint above rapidly with large swift motions with my bowl scraper I want to dispense the batter into the cake pan near the side.
  11. Bake as directed above in #5.
  12. Follow the hints 6-11 above.

 

Chef Susan’s Tres Leches Syrup
Hint: You need to caramelize the sweetened condensed milk using the brands recommended in the photographs. I do not use the brands that are already caramelized as the flavor of the cake would not be the same.

Yield: one 10 inch x 2 inch round cake

Approximately (2 pounds plus 11 ounces)

Caramelized sweetened condensed milk      1.75 ounces
Evaporated milk                                            2.25 ounces
Sweetened condensed milk                         14 ounces
Evaporated milk                                            3.25 ounces
Heavy whipping cream                                 1 pound 1 ounce
Light corn syrup                                            4.5 ounces
Vanilla Extract                                                2 plus ¼ teaspoons
Brandy                                                          1.25 ounces

Equipment Needed: Saucepan- 3 quart size, stainless steel whisk, measuring spoons, scale, ladle, hot pads.

  1. Once the sweetened condensed milk has been caramelized and the cake baked then proceeds.
  2. Measure 1.75 ounces caramelized milk and 3.25 ounces evaporated milk into the saucepan. Heat at medium while whisking constantly until the caramel melts into the evaporated milk (5 minutes or less just do not turn up the heat too high or the mixture will burn.)
  3. Add and bring to a boil, stirring constantly with a whisk  the 14 ounces sweetened condensed milk, 3.25 ounces evaporated milk, 1 pound plus 1 ounce heavy whipping cream(preferably not ultra-pasteurized), 4.5 ounces light corn syrup, 2 and ¼  teaspoons vanilla extract.
  4. Remove from heat once the mixture boils, let cool 5 minutes and add brandy.
  5. Use hints 10-21 to add the syrup and finish the cake.

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Free Pan Dulce Recipe Courtesy of Chef Susan (Illustrated Version)… https://bakingandcakeart.com/2014/04/18/free-pan-dulce-recipe-courtesy-of-chef-susan/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2014/04/18/free-pan-dulce-recipe-courtesy-of-chef-susan/#respond Fri, 18 Apr 2014 20:55:58 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=1886 Pan Dulce (Concha) When I began to think about what baked product I would try for National Hispanic Heritage Month I thought of those colorful breads known as pan dulce- sweet bread. I always wanted to try to make my own brightly colored rolls that I saw at special booths at bakery shows—probably at a […]

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Pan Dulce (Concha)

When I began to think about what baked product I would try for National Hispanic Heritage Month I thought of those colorful breads known as pan dulce- sweet bread. I always wanted to try to make my own brightly colored rolls that I saw at special booths at bakery shows—probably at a Bake Mark exhibit because the company manufactures commercial mixes for them.  Research, research, research led me to my experiments with internet versions and one that I found in a textbook, On Cooking, by Labensky.

Bought some store made which were light, light, light and airy and asked my students to taste my version and compare to the store bought, and-wow-mine won the taste and moisture tests, though I was not satisfied.  More testing led me to the current version which is explained in detail below.

Baked-Conchas-Ready-for-Breakfast-300x225

Some of the modifications to the recipe include type of bread flour used, type of yeast used, using Mexican vanilla in the dough, and adding color and flavoring to the pastas.  I also enlarged each of the rolls to 3 ounces the more commercial size of unbaked rolls.

Formula for Pan Dulce – (Conchas)

Mise en Place:  Scale, pastry brush, plastic dough container(optional), sheet pans, parchment paper, bench scraper, bowl scraper, 6 quart mixer, dough hook, lame or single edges razor blade, standard measuring spoons, dough thermometer, custard cup for melted shortening, gloves, rubber scraper, spray bottle filled with water, microwave.

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Dough:

Active Dry Yeast: 2 ounces

Water: 110 degrees F: 9 ounces

Unbleached Bread Four: 2 pounds plus 8 ounces

Eggs (cold): one pound

Granulated Sugar: 9. 75 ounces

Unsalted butter (room temperature): 6.5 ounces

Mexican Vanilla Extract: 2 tsp.

Salt (table): ¾ tsp.

Mise en Place:   5 quart mixer, paddle, tortilla press, parchment strips, cornstarch duster, rubber scraper.

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PASTA TOPPING:

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Unbleached Bread Flour: 8 ounces

Powdered Sugar: 10 ounces

Crisco Shortening: 10 ounces

Water: 3 ounces

Cocoa as needed for chocolate pasta (see directions),

Raspberry, Orange, Banana, Chocolate Extracts

Food Coloring: Pink, Yellow

Procedure:

Note: The method used for the dough is called straight dough method because you add all of the ingredients to mixer bowl directly after softening the yeast in the mixer bowl.

Part I: Dough

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-2088167922418770D4(1)  Yeast has softened and is ready to be added to the mixing bowl with all of the other ingredients

-6095441006F74C38C(2)  -10922865626F74C38C(4)

  1. Place yeast in 6 quart mixer bowl. Add 110 degree F water. Let yeast soften. To test, stir with your fingers and you will not feel any granules and the yeast are dispersed in the water. Take about 5-7 minutes.
  2. Add all other ingredients for the dough: bread flour, cold eggs, granulated sugar, unsalted room temperature butter, Mexican vanilla extract, and table salt, to the yeast and water mixture. Mix three minutes on low speed. Scrape dough down into the bowl and off hook.
  3. Again, set mixer, this time at medium speed and knead dough with hook attachment until soft and smooth, about 7-8 minutes.
  4. Test for window pane and when a bit of dough stretches between fingers without breaking, scrape onto your bench(marble, sheet pan, stainless counter, wooden cutting board).Dough should have an internal temperature between 82-84 degrees as measured with a dough thermometer. Sprinkle lightly with flour and cover with a plastic bag.
  5. Deflate and fold dough over itself every 30 minutes for 2.5-3 hours. (I did three hours).
  6. While the dough ferments, make the pasta dough topping.

Part II: Pasta Topping

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-7994102645A2C0D89(4)  190927011508196042(4)

  1. For the pasta topping I want several flavors and colors: yellow, chocolate brown, raspberry red, and plain (banana).
  2. Combine flour, powdered sugar, shortening, water in a 5 quart mixer bowl using paddle attachment.
  3. Divide mixed dough evenly using a scale: approximately 9 ounces for each color.
  4. Beginning with the lightest color desired I put the portioned dough back into the mixer bowl(if scraped clean of dough no need to wash each time you add the dough for a different color) and use the following formulas for each color and flavor of pasta toppings:

a.) Banana: 1 teaspoon banana extract, no added color
b.) Chocolate: 1 teaspoon chocolate extract and one-half ounce cocoa
c.) Raspberry: one teaspoon raspberry extract and a drop of neon pink food color.
d.) Yellow: two teaspoons orange extract and a drop of yellow food color.

     5. Each paste is mixed separately by putting the scaled 9 ounce portion back into the    mixer bowl with paddle adding extracts and or color if needed. I started with plain, then yellow, then raspberry, then chocolate—no need to wash bowl each time if you scrape the bowl clean each time as the pasta should not be sticky.

  Part III: Making the Pasta Rounds

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-14894667864494B900(3)  -208096798172820BB8(3)

  1. Cut strips of parchment paper the width of tortilla press and the shorter width of the paper.
  2. Scale out pasta dough 7/8ths ounce each. I scaled 6 at a time to prevent drying of the dough, though more rounds could be kept under plastic so more could be done at a time.
  3. Put one end of parchment paper onto opened tortilla press. Sprinkle with cornstarch puff place 7/8th ounce ball of pasta onto Parchment paper and press down lightly with hand. Fold parchment paper over this dough to cover and place a second portion of dough on top and flatten slightly with hand sprinkling with cornstarch puff lightly and cover this with the parchment paper. Press tortilla press over both dough portions firmly. You will have two flat rounds of dough that you will put as is in freezer to chill until you are finished with this procedure and ready to put on top of dough rounds.

Part IV: Scaling and Panning:

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-172677869205BD6E25(1)  9819016871EB93E6A(2)   -20091036944CA69122(2)

-21098602434CA69122(3)   18965561317A93E3DA(5)  -205127347611992714(5)

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-10296365634AB00416(9)  -208503121363ABD45B(10)

  1. After fermenting dough for 2.5-3 hours, Punch dough down gently to expel carbon dioxide and scale dough into 3 ounce portions. (I do this 12 at a time so that baking can be controlled. If I did all at one time I would need an extra oven. Though if things get out of control  you can put dough into refrigerator to “retard” the fermentation.
  2. Round dough portions and place onto papered ½ sheet pan spaced three evenly along each side away from pan edges.
  3. Flatten each dough round not as a tortilla but about a scant one-fourth inch thick…
  4. Brush each piece with melted shortening to the edges of dough. (I use a heat safe custard cup and warm in the microwave.)
  5. Remove 12 flattened pasta round from freezer (can do this when you begin step 4) and place them onto the shortening covered flattened dough. (I use a bowl scraper to remove the pasta from the parchment paper. If some break—just piece together and press lightly.)
  6. Score top in a curved design with a lame, paring knife(pointed) or single edged razor to resemble a shell design)
  7. Liberally sprinkle granulated sugar over the scored colored pasta.
  8. Proof at room temperature (75-82 degrees F) until rolls are more than double in size—did take around an hour.
  9. Open preheated 375 degree oven and quickly spray around oven cavity avoiding any lights with water—15 seconds or less and put one tray of rolls into upper bottom oven rack position. Spray oven door and sides for quick second avoiding rolls and close the oven door.
  10. Bake at 375 degrees (check your oven temperature before with an oven thermometer) for 8 minutes and turn pan around to allow for even baking. You will bake approximately 6 minutes more. You can only bake one pan at a time in a conventional oven. If you have a convection oven you will have to adjust oven temperatures.
  11. When light brown, remove from oven and cool on pan approximately 10 minutes and remove from pan onto a cooling rack.
  12. Shelf life of cooled and covered rolls is three days.
  13. Sooo Goood! Enjoy!  Chef Susan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Everyone Has A Chocolate Story! https://bakingandcakeart.com/2013/02/11/everyone-has-a-chocolate-story/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2013/02/11/everyone-has-a-chocolate-story/#respond Tue, 12 Feb 2013 04:52:26 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=1651   February is Celebrate Chocolate Month. One wonders if this is because of Valentine’s Day and its connection with giving chocolates to one’s sweetheart-or is it the other way around and the retailer’s holiday giving us another reason to buy chocolate.  It does seem that chocolate gets a lot of press in February whatever the […]

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February is Celebrate Chocolate Month. One wonders if this is because of Valentine’s Day and its connection with giving chocolates to one’s sweetheart-or is it the other way around and the retailer’s holiday giving us another reason to buy chocolate.  It does seem that chocolate gets a lot of press in February whatever the reason.

As a baker and cake artist who loves chocolate, it amazes me to see the refined results in a crisp crack of an oh-so-smooth Belgian bittersweet chocolate bar, which I consider a benchmark of chocolate’s 2,000 year history. When you compare that chocolate bar to the rather coarse appearance of its source, the cacao seed pods, you might agree that going from the proverbial point A to point B-so to speak has really “come a long way, baby.”
The photos below may help to illustrate my observations and a bit of chocolate history.

         
The obroma cacao, maybe in                     Look closely:  Proverbial Point A              An ancient beverage for
a Latin American rainforest.                        to point B.                                                    much of its 2000 year history.

My Chocolate Story

During my childhood through teen years, my family would play host to a large family gathering once a year. The food and its preparation and presentation were emphasized dramatically! My memory is fuzzy regarding how I helped with the actual dinner—I am sure that I did. I do remember most my efforts that were focused on making assorted cookies and candies that I packaged and gave to each guest as they were leaving when the party was over.

Much thought and time went into this endeavor. I was given permission to order the gift boxes and wrapping paper from catalogues months in advance and try out recipes and combinations of flavors and ingredients that, in my teen judgment, was thought to be just right. Credit to my mom for this process as well, as I do not recall any limits put onto my creativity! (Just a little hint here to those of you who are parents and dedicated to the promotion of your children’s self-esteem. Wow, this could be another article altogether!)

I especially enjoyed making fondant and dipped the hand-shaped pieces in real chocolate-not coating. I used my dipping forks purchased from catalogues and designed marks for the tops of the fondant patterned after See’s candy that at the time were my only reference points.

A bain marie (double boiler) was used to melt the chocolate (do not remember the brand but felt confident that it was the best money could buy-probably at the supermarket) and then dip the shaped fondant one by one.

I was completely self-taught regarding the dipping process yet aiming for perfection; therefore, you can imagine my frustration and unhappiness when I noticed some dipping inconsistencies which at that time were a mystery to me. Why was it that some years yielded dipped chocolates that would be shiny and handsome while other times spots would appear after storage and the result would be more cloudy than shiny? This proved frustrating, though the recipients of the dipped sweets were none the wiser and appreciated my efforts completely.

 

How My Story Can Help You!

My videos featured this month, show you how to make a Flourless Chocolate Torte, which makes it completely gluten-free. Also included is a demonstration in  which I teach you how to make a chocolate glaze that will always result in a shiny smooth finish! What is the difference between dipping chocolates and the incredible chocolate glaze that covers the Flourless Chocolate Torte that is featured in the video bundle offered at a huge savings to you this month?

HELP YOU GROW SECTION

It is important to always continue learning and improving your skills. This process never stops. So years later, I did discover the reasons for the inconsistent results to my chocolate dipping issues. What I was observing is the phenomenon known as confectionary bloom. According to texts on the subject, confectionary bloom refers to “the gray cast, streaks, or spots that appear on poorly handled chocolate.” Well-ok- ouch-in my self-taught teen years I handled the chocolate-gasp-poorly! I am glad my family did not have any confectioners among it!

What is interesting to note is that there are two types of “bloom”-fat bloom and sugar bloom. You see this on chocolate that is improperly tempered or stored. According to one source, it is difficult to distinguish sugar bloom from fat bloom by site. The test for this is simple-gently rubbing a sample of the bloomed chocolate on your lip or wrist. If the chocolate feels smooth, the bloom is fat bloom. If, however, you notice a rough texture to the chocolate, it is sugar bloom. So the bloom that I observed on my chocolates could have been either type.

Additional Advice

Some advice here about packaging your gifts based on my many years of experience both as a giver and receiver: when putting assorted cookies and confections together you need to wrap each separately. When you package or enclose various types of cookies together without wrapping each type in its own enclosed paper, the flavors will travel throughout the package. For example, if you package peanut butter kisses with sugar cookies, the peanut butter aroma and flavor plus the cookies’ moisture, will travel to the sugar cookie which prevents the true characteristics of each type of cookie to remain unique. In fact, the sugar cookie may become soft instead of its characteristic crisp!

In the case of my teenage gift packages, I needed to protect the confections from the moisture that would have travelled from the assorted cookies onto the chocolates. So it is difficult to deduce whether it was improper tempering that caused the bloom or whether it was improper packaging. Probably is a combination of both issues. One is always learning!

Butter combined with chocolate actually prevents bloom. So the glaze that I teach you in my Flourless Chocolate Torte Video Series featured this  month in honor of Chocolate Celebration Month, will always be a success partly because of the butter added and partly because I teach you how to correctly prepare and use the glaze!

When I had my upscale dessert business, Dessert Design, I supplied caterers and high-end groceries with various chocolate desserts. Pasadena’s Bristol Farms carried my Flourless Chocolate Torte that is demonstrated in my video series featured at a unique savings to you in honor of February: How to Make a Flourless Chocolate Torte. Gluten-free baking was not in the mainstream in those years as it is now, but the torte is not only glamorous and delicious, but it is gluten free and appropriate any time of the year!

 

Bake America Stronger!

Chef Susan

 

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An Easy Pullman Bread Lesson! https://bakingandcakeart.com/2013/01/21/an-easy-pullman-bread-lesson/ https://bakingandcakeart.com/2013/01/21/an-easy-pullman-bread-lesson/#respond Mon, 21 Jan 2013 19:41:02 +0000 http://bakingandcakeart.com/?p=1523 CELEBRATE BREAD BAKING MONTH!  Have you ever heard of the story of the “shoemaker’s daughter?” As a baking instructor with two teaching positions at two different campuses, making time to actually bake something in my own kitchen is one of my New Year’s Resolutions for 2103!  I have decided that for my own creative health […]

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CELEBRATE BREAD BAKING MONTH!

 Have you ever heard of the story of the “shoemaker’s daughter?” As a baking instructor with two teaching positions at two different campuses, making time to actually bake something in my own kitchen is one of my New Year’s Resolutions for 2103!  I have decided that for my own creative health I will actually schedule some of this time for myself. Also, I plan to share these handmade baked goods with neighbors, colleagues, and readers. So to begin, I thought to celebrate one of January’s Food and Beverage related holidays, National Wheat Bread Month, by creating a healthy Pullman loaf!

Intrigued with successful Pullman shaped loaves that we had baked in the Baker Fundamentals class during the regular semesters- Pullman loaves are a rectangular loaf with straight sides and flat top which unlike a typical bread loaf is completely symmetrical- I decided to discover if a 10-grain bread could be “trained” into a Pullman loaf! For what it is worth for some of you-I had to turn to baker’s percentages for my analysis and compare the usual Pullman loaf dough containing refined flour with my 10 grain version. This, I had to figure out myself, as there were no such guidelines in the textbook from which I gleaned the inspiration for the multigrain bread.

I experimented, reduced and deduced certain phenomena such as whole grains require more water than refined flours used in a usual Pullman loaf. The final dough contains 95% water! The original multigrain contained over 106% water! Now this is baker’s percentage jargon.

The result is a loaf that you can even bake in the afternoon and have it ready for the evening meal. You can achieve a slower rise by softening the yeast in 4 ounces of 110 degree water and add 4 ounces of 65 degree water that is added just before mixing all of the ingredients together with the dough hook.

Hope that you enjoy trying the results of my testing and my start at keeping my New Year’s Resolutions! I vow to do more creative baking this year at home share the results! Shoemaker’s daughter syndrome- bye-bye!

I hope that you try my formula and share your results with me. IF you have any questions or comments, you can reach me at susan@bakingandcakeart.com.

Bake America Stronger!

Chef Susan

Chef Susan’s Multigrain Pullman Loaf

Yield: one loaf approximately 2 pounds 12 ounces

Method:  Direct Dough (enhanced with longer fermentation time plus one fold)

Oven: 405 degrees Fahrenheit

Equipment: USA Pullman Pan with top 13 x4 x 4 inches, dough thermometer,5- quart stand mixer, bowl and dough hook, saucepan,medium stainless steel mixing bowl, standard measuring spoons, small spatula, scale, bowl scraper, oven rack positioned at second from bottom level position, hot pads, cooling rack.

Ingredients:

10 ounces boiling water

5.5 ounces 10-Grain Hot Cereal (Bob’s Red Mill)

8 ounces water-110 degrees

7/8 ounce Active Dry Yeast-(Red Star)

1.25 ounces Honey (I use Buckwheat)

1.5 teaspoons kosher salt

13.5 ounces Bread Flour (I used King Arthur Unbleached)

5.5 ounces whole Wheat Flour (Gold Medal)

1.0 ounces canola Oil

.75 ounce cornmeal

 

Procedure:

1.  Measure the 10 grain cereal into the 5 quart mixer.


2.  Add boiling water and cool to room temperature

      

3.  Place yeast into a small stainless bowl and add 110 degree water.  Let yeast soften until all is smooth when mixed with fingers.

     

4.  Add honey, salt, bread and whole wheat flours, cornmeal and oil to cooled 10 grain cereal.

5.  Pour softened yeast and water mixture over the previous ingredients in the bowl.

6.  Place dough hook onto mixer and turn on mixer for approximately 9 minutes at medium-high speed (I use speed 5 on Kitchen Aid), stopping the machine from time to time during the first 3 minutes to help the sticky dough off of the bowl sides and into the center mass of dough.

    

7.  Continue the full nine minutes until the sticky dough reaches a stretchy consistency and a window pane is evident when the dough is stretched.

8.  Cover the dough with a linen towel and let rise for 1and 1/2 hour.

9.  Uncover the dough and press the dough down while turning with a bowl scraper.

10.  Cover the bowl again and ferment another 45 minutes.

11.  Sprinkle some bread flour onto a slab (table top surface) and remove dough from bowl and press air out.

12.  Divide dough into two equal portions.

13.  Roll each half into a rope approximately two inches longer than Pullman pan.

14.  Twist the two halves together and place into the Pullman pan.

 

15.  Tap the dough down with fingers to level ropes.

16.  Attach Pullman pan cover to pan leaving 1-1/2 inch open to gauge height of proofing dough.

 

17.  When dough rises just below the top of the pan (30minutes approximately), close the lid and allow the lid to click into place.

18.  Let stand and additional 7 minutes.

19.  Place pan into a preheated 405 degree oven.

20.  Bake 40 minutes.

21.  Remove lid.  (If browner color is desired, bake approximately 5-7 more minutes uncovered.)

22.  Remove bread from pan onto cooling rack to prevent steam condensation.

23.Cool before serving (if you can wait).

 

 

24.  Bread will last several days in a plastic bag and will freeze beautifully for three weeks.  Delicious thickly sliced and toasted!

Any questions: please contact Chef Susan at : susan@bakingandcakeart.com

 

 

 

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